The School Psychology program at Mizzou is structured along 5 broad aims, including:

  1. To prepare psychologists who are knowledgeable about the history and foundations of the field of psychology. (Generalist)
  2. To prepare psychologists who are knowledgeable about the history and development of the field of school psychology and its current and emerging practices and issues. (Specialist)
  3. To prepare psychologists who are skilled consumers and producers of psychological and educational research. (Scientist/Scholar)
  4. To prepare psychologists who are competent providers of evidence-based assessment, intervention, and consultation services to address individual- and systems-level challenges. (Clinician/Practitioner)
  5. To prepare professionals who adhere to professional, ethical, and legal standards, engaging in research and providing services in the context of a multicultural, pluralistic society (Ethical/Multicultural)

Guided by these broad aims, all program graduates are expected to develop the following competencies as part of their training in school psychology and health services psychology according to APA’s Standards of Accreditation, as detailed in the 10 competencies areas below:

  1. Research: To prepare future school psychologists who demonstrate knowledge, skills, and competence sufficient to produce new knowledge, to critically evaluate existing research and use existing knowledge to solve problems, and to disseminate scientific research
  2. Ethical and Legal Standards: To prepare future school psychologists who are knowledgeable of and act in accordance with ethical and legal standards, apply ethical decision-making processes to resolve dilemmas, and conduct themselves in an ethical manner in all professional activities.
  3. Individual and cultural diversity: To prepare future school psychologists with foundational knowledge, awareness, sensitivity, and skills to effectively work with diverse individuals and groups, and to integrate awareness and knowledge of individual and cultural differences in the conduct of professional roles.
  4. Professional values and attitudes: To prepare future school psychologists who behave in ways that reflect the values and attitudes of psychology, including a clear commitment to professional growth via self-reflection and responsiveness to feedback.
  5. Communication and interpersonal skills: To prepare future school psychologists with the communication and interpersonal skills necessary for professional practice and for effective collaboration with others in the delivery of professional services.
  6. Assessment: To prepare future school psychologists with the evidence-based assessment skills, including selection, application, interpretation, integration, and communication of assessments, necessary for competent delivery of professional services.
  7. Intervention: To prepare future school psychologists with the evidence-based intervention skills, including selection, implementation, evaluation of effectiveness, and communication of interventions, necessary for competent delivery of professional services.
  8. Supervision: To prepare future school psychologists with knowledge of supervision models and practices.
  9. Consultation and interprofessional/interdisciplinary skills: To prepare future school psychologists with knowledge of consultation models and practices and the consultation skills necessary for competent delivery of professional services.
  10. Professional knowledge of the field of school psychology: To prepare future school psychologists who professionally identify as psychologists practicing in the sub-discipline of school psychology, demonstrating their knowledge of the history and development of the field of school psychology, its similarities to/distinctions from other related disciplines in psychology and education, and its traditional and emerging roles and models of practice.