Instructional Practices Inventory Documents

Instructional Practices Inventory Documents

Instructional Practices Inventory Documents

  1. IPI Level I Workshop Host Information

    Hundreds of Instructional Practices Inventory Level I workshops are conducted throughout the United States each year.  The workshops are led by an IPI certified trainer and require a minimum of 7 hours to complete.  The workshops include opportunities to develop competence in using the IPI instrument to collect observation data and develop IPI profiles, as well as discussions and strategies about how to facilitate the faculty analysis and collaborative problem-solving activities once the profiles are developed.  The IPI workshops include hands-on learning, collaborative verbal learning conversations, authentic practice in a school setting, and a reliability assessment so each participant is clearly aware of their level of competence with the instrument.  IPI workshops are typically hosted by local school districts or by regional or area educational agencies serving a number of schools and districts.  Most IPI training sessions are limited to 30 participants.  This limitation ensures that the participants will leave the session with a thorough understanding of the IPI process and the competence to use the IPI process in their local school setting.  The two files below will be helpful if you are responsible for hosting an IPI workshop.  One provides basic information if you need to publicize your upcoming Level I Workshop.  The other provides details about the physical arrangements you will need to know if you are hosting a Level I and Level II IPI Workshop.

    Click here to view a copy of the IPI Workshop Host Publicity Information

    Click here to view a copy of the IPI Workshop Host Physical Arrangements

    (top)


  2. IPI Observation Rubric

    Listed on this document are the three broad categories in the first column, the six coding categories in the second column and an explanation of the each of the six coding categories in the third column.  This was the original Rubric and will be replaced by a more informative, easier to read rubric in the fall of 2007 (see IPI Category Descriptions and Common Look-Fors)

    Click here to see a copy of the IPI Observation Rubric

    (top)


  3. IPI Category Descriptions and Common Look-Fors

    Display your answer or extended information here. Use the formatting tools above to arrange content, insert images, and construct hyperlinks.

    To add an additional question to this category or to remove this question. Use the Plus "+" or minus "-" in the upper left corner of this window under "FAQs Category >> Questions". You'll also notice it will allow you to reorganize questions using the up or down arrows.

    Click here to see a copy of the IPI Category Descriptions and Common Look-Fors

    (top)


  4. IPI Data Collection Process and Protocols

    To obtain valid and reliable data for faculty analysis and decision making, the procedures used to collect the IPI data must be consistent within each data collection and across different data collections.  Typically, schools collect data three times a year, commonly in October or November, January or February, and April or May.  Data collection should be done by teachers from the school or school leaders from other schools.  In most instances, data collection by the principal or assistant principal is not productive because of the difficulty of disassociating the IPI process from the evaluation process.  Area education agency staff are often used to collect profile data and facilitate the faculty analysis and discussion.  A data collection should include at least 100 observations and preferably 130-150 observations.  Data are commonly collected throughout a “typical” school day and represent a proportionate sampling of learning experiences from all learning settings (classrooms).   During the IPI Level I Training workshop, participants are provided with the necessary reading, materials, practice scenarios, and authentic observations to build the capacity to collect data at the .90 accuracy level.  For obvious reasons, high levels of coder reliability are essential for the production of accurate profiles, upon which the analyses and problem solving are based.  The following list provides some of the basic protocols used in the data collection process.  This list is merely a start in the complex set of procedures necessary to develop coder reliability.  In other words, this is not a complete list of protocols, as developing reliability requires the application of these protocols and numerous other guidelines.  In fact, a study analyzing the reliability of a set of post-masters graduate students attempting to code accurately based upon information from the web and written materials, but lacking participation in the Level I workshop, produced coder reliability ratings between .05 and .20, numbers far from adequate to use for profiling and decision making.

    Click here to see a summary listing of IPI Data Collection Protocols

    (top)


  5. Key Mental Image: Faculty Collaborative Analysis and Problem Solving

    This area is currently under construction.

    We apologize for the inconvenience.

    (top)


  6. Key Mental Image: Collecting the Observational Data

    This area is currently under construction.

    We apologize for the inconvenience.

    (top)


  7. Current and Future Research

    This area is currently under construction.

    We apologize for the inconvenience.

    (top)


  8. IPI Level I Workshops

    This area is currently under construction.

    We apologize for the inconvenience.

    (top)


  9. IPI Level II Workshops

    This area is currently under construction.

    We apologize for the inconvenience.

    (top)


  10. Current and Future District and State IPI Projects

    This area is currently under construction.

    We apologize for the inconvenience.

    (top)


  11. Frequently Asked Questions and Answers

    This area is currently under construction.

    We apologize for the inconvenience.

    (top)


(top)